Slavery In America – And How Susie King Taylor Overcame The Trap

Susie King Taylor Rose Above Her Slavery In America!

Susie King Taylor was a victim of Slavery in America and was therefore denied an education, but other black women taught her how to read and to write and she rose above her past.

 

Susie King Taylor, was a slave, then a domestic worker, then a laundress, then the first black army nurse, and finally a teacher.

King Taylor lived in Savannah GA and gained her freedom from slavery at the age of fourteen after which she contributed to the Civil War efforts by serving as a nurse to black soldiers, and later by teaching them to read and write.

She was a slave and therefore denied an education, but other black women taught her how to read and write.

In 1862 she moved with her husband to Port Royal Island off the coast of South Carolina.

Once there, her husband joined the First South Carolina Volunteers, which was an all-black army made up of former slaves from the Sea Islands, and it was one of the first African-American military units.

They seriously needed medical help so even though she had no former medical training, she became the first black army nurse and worked on the battlefield for four years.

When her first husband died at the end of the Civil War she moved north to Boston, Massachusetts where she met and later married Russell Taylor.

More details about How Susie King Taylor Rose Above Her Slavery In America!

Susie King Taylor-Bio

Born August 5, 1848, Grest Plantation, Isle of Wight, GA;
The first of nine children of Hagar Ann Reed and Raymond Baker
Married Edward King, born 1862 – died in 1866
Married Russell Taylor, born 1879 – died October 6, 1912 in Boston.
She was buried in an unmarked grave, at Mount Hope Cemetery, Roslindale.

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